"Patriotic History" and the (Re)Nationalization of Memory: Global Perspectives

"Patriotic History" and the (Re)Nationalization of Memory: Global Perspectives

Veranstalter
MSA WG Memory & Populism
PLZ
0000
Ort
Online
Land
Deutschland
Vom - Bis
12.07.2022 -
Von
Vanessa Tautter

This panel of the MSA Working Group on Memory & Populism takes a global perspective on ‘patriotic history’ and explores the (re)nationalization of memory in sample cases from different parts of the world. To do so, it brings together some of the contributors to the special issue of the Journal of Genocide Research on “Patriotic Histories and the (Re)Nationalization of Memory” to discuss these ongoing issues.

"Patriotic History" and the (Re)Nationalization of Memory: Global Perspectives

Memory & Populism Panel, Tuesday, 12 July 2022, 12-2pm CET (via Zoom)

“Patriotic History” and the (Re)Nationalization of Memory: Global Perspectives

Chair: Vanessa Tautter (University of Brighton)
Presenters:
- Tamara P. Trošt (University of Ljubljana): Renationalizing Memory in the Post-Yugoslav Region
- Sabine Volk (Jagiellonian University): Patriotic History in Postcolonial Germany, Thirty Years After “Reunification”
- Andrea Pető (Central European University): The Illiberal Memory Politics in Hungary
- Edward Vickers (Kyushu University): Smothering Diversity: Patriotism in China's School Curriculum under Xi Jinping

With an introduction by Kornelia Kończal (Bielefeld University)

This panel takes a global perspective on ‘patriotic history’ and explores the (re)nationalization of memory in sample cases from different parts of the world. To do so, it brings together some of the contributors to the special issue of the Journal of Genocide Research on “Patriotic Histories and the (Re)Nationalization of Memory” to discuss these ongoing issues.

Kornelia Kończal and Dirk Moses (2021), the editors of the special issue, describe recent trends in public memory politics in relation to the (re-)emergence of such patriotic national narratives as follows: “The state-mandated or state-encouraged ‘patriotic’ histories that have recently emerged in so many places around the globe is a complex phenomenon. It can revolve around both affirmative interpretations of history and celebration of past achievements, and an explicitly denialist stance opposed to acknowledging responsibility for past atrocities, even to the extent of celebrating perpetrators. ... Despite differences between the individual settings, there is little doubt that state-mandated or state-encouraged 'patriotic' history is more confrontational and combative than a 'feel good history' promoting positive sentiments for one’s country, and that it cannot be limited to the 'illiberal memory' accompanying the recent rise of right-wing populism as it cuts across the political spectrum and can be observed in both democratic and authoritarian surroundings. By combining nationalist and narcissist narratives and by disregarding or distorting historical evidence, 'patriotic' history promotes mythified, monumental, and moralistic interpretations of the past that posit partisan and authoritarian essentialisms and exceptionalisms.”

This panel will interrogate this disturbing trend by bringing together case studies from different countries.

To join, contact Sabine Volk (sabine.volk@uj.edu.pl) and Vanessa Tautter (v.tautter@brighton.ac.uk) to register.

Kontakt

Sabine Volk (sabine.volk@uj.edu.pl) and Vanessa Tautter (v.tautter@brighton.ac.uk)