Stepping Back in Time. Living History and Other Performative Approaches to History in Central and South-Eastern Europe

Stepping Back in Time. Living History and Other Performative Approaches to History in Central and South-Eastern Europe

Veranstalter
German Historical Institute Warsaw and Imre Kertész Kolleg Jena
Veranstaltungsort
German Historical Institute, Aleje Ujazdowskie 39, PL 00-540 Warszawa
Ort
Warsaw
Land
Poland
Vom - Bis
23.02.2017 - 24.02.2017
Deadline
19.02.2017
Von
Sabine Stach

Action, experience and emotion are the focus when it comes to performativity. In cultural studies, the performative turn has shifted the focus away from texts and structures to inquiries into actions performed and the bodily experiences involved in creating collective meaning. In the field of history terms such as “living history,” “doing history” and "reenactment” have been established to characterize the experiential component of various practices of reviving, restaging and appropriating events from the past in the present. The phenomena in question include battle reenactments and reconstructions of the past in museums, computer games and theme-based tourist attractions. Precise definitions and exact terminological distinctions have yet to be established, however.

One reason for the problem of defining these areas might be that the phenomena of living history (used here as a collective term for forms of bodily-sensual references to the past) are often pop-culture practices found at the interface between science, practical applications, and the entertainment industry. (Re)living history is distinct from academic research in its performative and affective elements. These circumstances, as well as the variety of forms living history takes, make describing and analyzing performative approaches to the past a challenge for historiography.

While research into the phenomena of living history has spread beyond the English-speaking world to include Western and Central Europe, it is still in its infancy in East-Central and Southeastern Europe. The planned workshop takes this as its starting point, inquiring into the specific forms of living history in this region. Apart from the description of individual phenomena, the varied analytical approaches to this field used by researchers in various disciplines will be presented and discussed at the workshop. Comparative approaches too, focusing on different regions at once, are more than welcome.

The aim of the workshop is to enable an intensive dialogue between researchers in various disciplines engaged in the description and analysis of living history in East-Central and Southeastern Europe. The advantages and disadvantages of individual analytical approaches will be discussed along with the problems of exact definitions.

The keynote lecture titled "Reenacting Genocide" will be held by Vanessa Agnew.

If you want to participate in the workshop please register via e-mail: stach@dhi.waw.pl. There is no conference fee.

Programm

THURSDAY, 23.2.2017

12.45 Registration

13.00 Welcome + Introduction (Miloš Řezník, Raphael Utz, Juliane Tomann, Sabine Stach)

13.30-15.30 LIVING HISTORY & REENACTMENT – NATIONAL PERSPECTIVES
(1) Kamila Baraniecka-Olszewska (Warsaw): Polish Historical Reenactment: Between Hobby and Mission
(2) Melinda Harlov (Budapest): The Scope of Living History examples in Hungary
(3) Ignat Stoychev (Sofia): Living History in the Bulgarian Context
Chair: Juliane Tomann (Jena/Princeton)

15.30-15.45 Coffee break

15.45-17.45 ART PERFORMANCES & HISTORY
(1) Maria-Alina Asavei (Prague): Performing History and Living Memory in Recent International Art Exhibitions in Romania
(2) Caterina Preda (Bucharest): Living Statues: The Role of Art of Memory in Post-communist Romania
(3) Nela Milic (London): Performing Nostalgia: Yugo Yoga
Chair: Annika Wienert (Warsaw)

18.00 Vanessa Agnew (Duisburg/Essen): Reenacting Genocide

19.30 Reception


FRIDAY, 24.2.2017

9.00 Andreas Körber (Hamburg): Living History – Place, Purpose or Topic of Historical Learning?

9.45-11.45 DEALING WITH A VERY RECENT PAST – PERFORMATIVE PRACTICES IN SOUTH-EASTERN EUROPE
(1) Sanela Hodžić (Sarajevo): The White Bands: Living an Ignored History
(2) Nena Močnik (Ljubljana): Acting Out the Painful Past: Community Theatre from Overcoming the Trauma to Embracing Forgiveness after the Conflict
(3) Elma Selman (Sarajevo): Performing Temporary Monuments, Addressing the Past: Regional Theater Initiatives in South-Eastern Europe
Chair: Bryce Lease (London)

11.45-12.00 Coffee break

12.00-14.00 (RE)STAGING MEMORY: DIFFICULT HERITAGE BETWEEN COMMODIFICATION, NATION BRANDING & RITUALIZATION
(1) Nataša Jagdhuhn (Jena): Re-visiting Yugoslavia’s Day of Republic in Jajce: The Stage and the Script
(2) Jovana Vukčević (Podgorica): The Price of Memory: Commodifying Legacies of Unwanted Heritage in the Balkans
(3) Tanja Schult (Stockholm): Remembering together – POLIN’s Daffodil Campaign and Holocaust Memory
Chair: Sabine Stach (Warsaw)

14.00-15.00 Lunch

15.00-17.00 POLISH IDENTITY POLITICS FROM A PERFORMATIVE PERSPECTIVE
(1) Ralf Hoppadietz/Karin Reichenbach (Leipzig): Archaeological Open-air Museums and Prehistory Reenactment in Germany and Poland. From 20th Century Politicizations to Current Attempts of Nationalist Appropriations
(2) Bryce Lease (London): Affective Encounters, Disavowed Narratives: POLIN & the Warsaw Uprising Museum from a performative perspective
(3) Zuzanna Bogumił (Warsaw): The Museum Effect: from Religious Ritual to Performative Experience – The case of Blessed Jerzy Popiełuszko museums
Chair: Iwona Kurz (Warsaw)

17.00-17.15 Coffee break

17.15-18.15 Roundtable (Iwona Kurz, Kamila Baraniecka-Olszewska, Andreas Körber, Vanessa Agnew)

Kontakt

Sabine Stach

Deutsches Historisches Institut Warschau
Aleje Ujazdowskie 39, PL 00-540 Warszawa
(+48 22) 525 83 00

stach@dhi.waw.pl

http://www.dhi.waw.pl/