The New Global Studies 1 (2007) 1

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The New Global Studies 1 (2007) 1.
Zeitschriftentitel


Hrsg. v.
Nayan Chanda (Yale University), Akira Iriye (Harvard University), Bruce Mazlish (MIT) Managing editor: Kenneth Weisbrode (Harvard University)
Heft(e)
1
Erschienen
Herausgeber d. Zeitschrift
Nayan Chanda (Yale University) Akira Iriye (Harvard University) Bruce Mazlish (MIT) Sassen, Saskia Managing editor: Kenneth Weisbrode (Harvard University)

New Global Studies is the first journal to approach contemporary globalization as a whole, and across disciplinary lines. It draws from history, sociology, anthropology, political science, and international relations to study the past and present of today's globalizing process. Topics include the patterns and local effects of economic globalization, global media networks, preservation of the global environment, transnational manifestations of culture, and the methodology of global studies itself. New Global Studies is an essential resource: a single journal for those who are interested in global affairs and the contemporary history of globalization, both broadly and in depth.

ARTICLES

David E.H. Edgerton "The Contradictions of Techno-Nationalism and Techno-Globalism: A Historical Perspective".
http://www.bepress.com/ngs/vol1/iss1/art1

Jenifer L. Van Vleck "The 'Logic of the Air': Aviation and the Globalism of the 'American Century'".
http://www.bepress.com/ngs/vol1/iss1/art2

Timothy H.B. Stoneman "An 'African' Gospel: American Evangelical Radio in West Africa, 1954-1970".
http://www.bepress.com/ngs/vol1/iss1/art3

COMMENTARY

Yi-Fu Tuan "Power, Modernity and Traditional Cultures".
http://www.bepress.com/ngs/vol1/iss1/art4

REVIEW ESSAYS

Daniel J. Sargent "School of Zbigniew".
http://www.bepress.com/ngs/vol1/iss1/art5

Phyllis Thompson "Food for the Masses".
http://www.bepress.com/ngs/vol1/iss1/art6

To submit your next paper to New Global Studies, visit http://www.bepress.com/ngs, and click "Submit Article."

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ABSTRACTS & CITATIONS OF NEWLY PUBLISHED ARTICLES

David E.H. Edgerton (2007) "The Contradictions of Techno-Nationalism and Techno-Globalism: A Historical Perspective", New Global Studies: Vol. 1: No. 1, Article 1.
http://www.bepress.com/ngs/vol1/iss1/art1

ABSTRACT:
Techno-nationalism and techno-globalism are descriptive and prescriptive categories for understanding the impact of technology on society and vice versa. They reflect the underlying assumptions made by analysts of the place of technology in the world, and denote ideologies, rather than technological policies or realities. They also help us to realize that standard accounts of the nation and globalization are not as securely based as they appear. Indeed, nations and states are important in ways techno-nationalism does not capture, and the international and global dimension is crucial in ways which that techno-globalism overlooks. Yet an analysis of both terms yields building blocks to a more sophisticated appreciation of the linkages between the nation, technological innovation and globalization.

Jenifer L. Van Vleck (2007) "The 'Logic of the Air': Aviation and the Globalism of the 'American Century'", New Global Studies: Vol. 1: No. 1, Article 2.
http://www.bepress.com/ngs/vol1/iss1/art2

ABSTRACT:
"The 'Logic of the Air': Aviation and the Globalism of the 'American Century'" examines the cultural history of aviation in relation to the rise of the United States as a world power. In the context of World War II, the so-called air age entailed new conceptions of American national identity and global responsibility. Aviation inspired internationalist visions of "one world" - a globe divided only by latitudes and longitudes, as depicted by the iconic logo of Pan American Airways. However, aviation also sustained the nationalist vision of an "American Century" defined by U.S. geopolitical, economic, and ideological power. The airplane promised to extend America's frontiers "to infinity," as Pan Am President Juan T. Trippe was fond of saying. Ultimately, aviation helped define a nationalist globalism that construed America's interests as the world's interests. The cultural "logic of the air" embodied the universalizing aspirations of American foreign policy, yet also signified what was exceptional about the United States; aviation both instantiated American empire and denied that it was such. The article traces this dynamic by examining both cultural representations of aviation and U.S. international aviation policy.

Timothy H.B. Stoneman (2007) "An 'African' Gospel: American Evangelical Radio in West Africa, 1954-1970", New Global Studies: Vol. 1: No. 1, Article 3.
http://www.bepress.com/ngs/vol1/iss1/art3

ABSTRACT:
During the second half of the twentieth century, Christianity underwent an epochal transformation from a predominantly Western religion to a world religion largely defined by non-Western adherents in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Broadcast media, spearheaded by American evangelical missionaries, played an important role in the globalization of Christianity. After WWII, conservative Protestant missionaries from the United States established a "far-flung global network" of radio stations around the world with the avowed purpose of proselytizing the entire globe. In Liberia, American missionaries organized Station ELWA, the first evangelical station in Africa. The medium of radio proved well suited to the "universal" mission of American evangelicals, particularly after the expansion of worldwide ownership in transistor radios during the 1960s. Yet the success of missionary radio stations such as ELWA rested on an extensive process of translation into local customs and practices. Between 1954 and 1970, ELWA officials and workers constructed transmission platforms, political relations, language services, receiver distribution campaigns, and community networks. These constructs functioned as the crucial grids through which the "universal" meaning of evangelicalism was produced at the grass-roots level. As the history of ELWA in Liberia makes clear, American evangelical broadcasters acquired converts only by adapting their gospel message to fit particular churches, cultures, and contexts across the globe. Localizing missionary radio required the appropriation of indigenous cultural capital, the transposition of national partners, and the active agency of audiences on the ground.

Yi-Fu Tuan (2007) "Power, Modernity and Traditional Cultures", New Global Studies: Vol. 1: No. 1, Article 4.
http://www.bepress.com/ngs/vol1/iss1/art4

ABSTRACT:
A fable and a dream about the intersection of global and local culture.

Daniel J. Sargent (2007) "School of Zbigniew", New Global Studies: Vol. 1: No. 1, Article 5.
http://www.bepress.com/ngs/vol1/iss1/art5

ABSTRACT:
Daniel J. Sargent reviews Zbigniew Brzezinski's Second Chance.

Phyllis Thompson (2007) "Food for the Masses", New Global Studies: Vol. 1: No. 1, Article 6.
http://www.bepress.com/ngs/vol1/iss1/art6

ABSTRACT:
Phyllis Thompson reviews Kenneth Kiple's A Movable Feast: Ten Millennia of Food Globalization.

Zitation
The New Global Studies 1 (2007) 1. in: Connections. A Journal for Historians and Area Specialists, 09.11.2007, <www.connections.clio-online.net/journal/id/zeitschriftenausgaben-3756>.
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