CfP: Neue Call for Panels 08.09.2017 [5]

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Liebe Leserinnen und Leser,

um die Zahl der täglich versandten Beiträge etwas zu reduzieren, fassen wir ausgewählte Ankündigungen einmal wöchentlich als 'Digest' zusammen. Die vollständigen Ankündigungstexte finden Sie im Anschluss und auf der H-Soz-Kult-Website unter:

1)
Antje Dietze, University of Leipzig / Alexander Vari, Marywood University
Subject: CfP: Global Trends in the Popular Culture and Nighttime Entertainment of European Cities, 1880s–1930s - Rome 8/2018
<http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/termine/id=34857>

2)
María Ángeles Martín Romera (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München); Pierluigi Terenzi (Università di Padova); Hannes Ziegler (German Historical Institute London)
Subject: CfP: Norms and Behaviour: Developing Princely Officers' Praxis and Regulations in European Towns (13th-18th c.) - Session SS07 of the EAUH 2018 Conference - Rome 8/2018
<http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/termine/id=34883>

3)
Amy Singer / Katalin Szende / Peter Stabel / Arie van Steensel
Subject: CfP: EAUH 2018: Session M03. Fragmented Cities: Governance, Citizenship and Urban Renewal in Premodern Eurasia (1200-1700) - Rome 10/2017
<http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/termine/id=34908>

4)
University of Bristol, Centre for Medieval Studies (CMS)
Subject: CfP: Memory and the materiality of medieval texts. Leeds IMC 2018 - Bristol 7/2018
<http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/termine/id=34921>

5)
European Association for American Studies and British Association for American Studies
Subject: CfP: Science Fiction and Social Activism - London 9/2017
<http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/termine/id=34969>

1)
From: Antje Dietze <adietze@uni-leipzig.de>
Date: 23.08.2017
Subject: CfP: Global Trends in the Popular Culture and Nighttime Entertainment of European Cities, 1880s–1930s - Rome 8/2018
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Antje Dietze, University of Leipzig / Alexander Vari, Marywood University, Rome
29.08.2018-01.09.2018, Antje Dietze, University of Leipzig / Alexander Vari, Marywood University

Global Trends in the Popular Culture and Nighttime Entertainment of European Cities, 1880s–1930s
Session SS28 at the 14th EAUH International Conference on Urban History

The role that dance halls, cabarets and variety theatres, and cultural imports like the cakewalk, tango and jazz played in the rise of a pan European and global commercial popular culture, has been addressed either from the perspective of a single city or a comparison between Western and North American metropolises. Thus while London, Berlin, and Paris and their connections especially to New York have attracted scholarly attention, less is known about how other European cities like Lisbon, Barcelona, Milan, Rome, Vienna, Budapest, Belgrade, Bucharest, Athens, Cracow, St. Petersburg, Copenhagen and Stockholm, to mention just a few, have included both original genres and sources, and have been connected through their emerging nighttime entertainment industry to global trends within the sphere of urban popular culture.

With this in mind, this session aims to explore several sets of questions: What was the local impact of turn-of-the-century and interwar global popular cultural trends? Why were some popular culture genres that circulated from one geographic locale to another, more successful than others? Who were the agents of these cultural transfers, how were specific nighttime entertainment institutions connected to these global networks, and how, in return, did these agents and institutions influence global trends in urban popular culture?

In addition to considering Western and Central European cities, this session aims to include analyses of the emergence of such global connections in urban centres located in Europe’s southern, northern and eastern regions. With the intention to complicate the analysis of the various late nineteenth and early twentieth century waves of cultural globalization affecting nighttime entertainment networks in Europe, the session also pays attention to local and inter-regional interactions within Europe as well as, in addition to the much-researched cultural exchanges with North America, to Latin American, Middle Eastern and Asian influences.

Please note that to submit a paper proposal, registration is required. Paper proposals and full texts can only be submitted online, via the website of the European Association for Urban History (EAUH) https://eauh2018.ccmgs.it/users/. Abstracts of paper proposals should not exceed 450 words.

Deadline for paper proposals submission: October 5th, 2017

Notification of paper acceptance: December 1st, 2017
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Antje Dietze
SFB 1199
Universität Leipzig

0341 9737765
adietze@uni-leipzig.de

Homepage https://eauh2018.ccmgs.it/users/index.php?pagename=cms&name=sessiontracksacks
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URL zur Zitation dieses Beitrages
<http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/termine/id=34857>
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2)
From: Pierluigi Terenzi <pierluigi.terenzi@gmail.com>
Date: 28.08.2017
Subject: CfP: Norms and Behaviour: Developing Princely Officers' Praxis and Regulations in European Towns (13th-18th c.) - Session SS07 of the EAUH 2018 Conference - Rome 8/2018
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María Ángeles Martín Romera (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München); Pierluigi Terenzi (Università di Padova); Hannes Ziegler (German Historical Institute London), Rome
29.08.2018-01.09.2018, María Ángeles Martín Romera (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München); Pierluigi Terenzi (Università di Padova); Hannes Ziegler (German Historical Institute London)

The state-building debate has increasingly focused on the development of princely offices as one of the main instruments to secure the presence of a central power in the territory and especially in towns. In this perspective, the study of state-building is largely the analysis of an ongoing process characterised by the succession of new regulations and changing behavioural standards for princely officers from the 13th century onwards. These changes affected the central administration as well as regional and local institutions leading to the renewal of political and social urban structures.

While regulations have often been seen as a top-down mechanism, concepts like negotiation, “pactism”, resistance, co-evolution of local and central, “state-building from below” or “empowering interactions” have changed the narrative in recent studies. Following that trend, this session aims to address the daily interactions of officers and urban communities, underlining the latter’s active role both in designing officer regulations and in shaping specific behavioural standards.

Our assumption is that these behavioural standards played a key role in the officers’ regulations and in the expectations of the populations. The compliance or transgression by office holders affected the relation with the urban community thereby assuring acquiescence, obtaining collaboration or causing conflict.

We ask the participants to focus on the renewal of norms and behaviour of princely officers as a point of confluence for urban history, social history, institutional history, anthropology, and even performance studies. The papers should analyse the social and political changes brought on by the interplay between the institutional norms and the agents’ (community and officers) praxis:
- To which extent were regulations modelled by the population - through resistance, collaboration or negotiation, either directly with the officers or aiming at higher authorities, for example through petitions to the parliament or the Crown?
- How did urban populations enforce certain behavioural standards in the officers’ praxis and in the very norms of the office?
- Which divergences and convergences can be traced between praxis and regulation and how did they interact? Although we assume a sort of co-evolution of both levels, we aim for papers that can discuss concrete dynamics regarding how regulations influenced behaviour and vice versa.

Papers should concern one or more European areas – including monarchies, the Papal State and northern Italian regional states –, preferably on a long period of time (at least two centuries) between the 13th and the 18th centuries, in order to allow a comparison between different regional long-durée trends.

Scholars are invited to register to the EAUH 2018 website and submit their proposal online: https://eauh2018.ccmgs.it/call-for-papers/*
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Pierluigi Terenzi
DISSGEA - Università di Padova
Via del Vescovado 30, Padova (Italy)

pierluigi.terenzi@unipd.it

Homepage https://eauh2018.ccmgs.it/users/index.php?pagename=cms&name=sessiontracks&trackname=norms-and-behaviour--developing-princely-officers--praxis-and-regulations-in-european-towns--13th-18th-c--18th-c--
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URL zur Zitation dieses Beitrages
<http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/termine/id=34883>
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3)
From: Arie van Steensel <avs.news@outlook.com>
Date: 01.09.2017
Subject: CfP: EAUH 2018: Session M03. Fragmented Cities: Governance, Citizenship and Urban Renewal in Premodern Eurasia (1200-1700) - Rome 10/2017
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Amy Singer / Katalin Szende / Peter Stabel / Arie van Steensel, Rome
05.10.2017-01.09.2018, Amy Singer / Katalin Szende / Peter Stabel / Arie van Steensel

Call for papers – EAUH Conference 2018, Rome

Session M03. Fragmented Cities: Governance, Citizenship and Urban Renewal in Premodern Eurasia (1200-1700)

One of the great narratives in urban history is that self-government has stimulated urban agency and economic development. In Europe, it is claimed, political competition led to a competitive playing field, in which new ideas about citizenship, governance, and political participation could flourish. In polities with strong state control, such a dynamic playing field could not develop. Historians have in the meantime nuanced this hypothesis, while others have pointed at strong differences within each of the polities. Cities in both Europe and Asia were by nature fragmented entities, where no single authority (centralized states, local lords or city governments) was able if only logistically to control the urban social fabric, let alone monopolize political decision making. The session tackles the issue of fragmented authority and its consequences for the notions of citizenship and governance across the Eurasian continent. Starting point is the idea that strong centralized government was very difficult, even when allegedly strong local authorities were concerned. In Europe territorial liberties, feudal and ecclesiastical, provided competitive institutions, guild loyalties and jurisdictions were crucial in creating a fragmented body politic that depended upon permanent bargaining procedures and, of course, there was state-city competition, all creating a framework in which subjects often depended on often different sets of rules. In the Islamic world endowments, waqf, linked with charity, but also with the urban social and economic fabric, provided different sets of rules, loyalties and spatial dynamics. Elsewhere on the Eurasian continent relations between local power structures and state institutions were again organized differently. The key question, then, is how these different legal, social and/or political identities affected the agency of town dwellers and their identities, and practices of governance.

This fragmented nature of cities was particularly at stake when processes of urban renewal were concerned and processes of negotiation among different interest groups became essential. The different levels of urban authority all developed policies in the face of demands from subjects, citizens and others who harboured expectations about the responsibilities of each of these authorities. By exploring these political and social dynamics of urban renewal – defined in a broad sense as the collective efforts of (groups of) urbanites to improve the cultural, economic, social and environmental conditions of city life – the panel will present case studies that link the efforts of different authorities, the role of experts, the circulation of knowledge, and the ways different urban interest groups interacted with different kinds of authority. The aim is to answer the question as to how these interactions shaped political decision-making, citizenship and identities, and renewal processes in in the cities of premodern Eurasia.

The papers are expected to centre on three sets of questions:
- First, what kind of projects of urban renewal did urban authorities embark upon, from building operations through sanitary measures to social and educational enterprises? How were projects initiated, financed and executed?
- Second, which practices, ideas, or know-how informed the policies and measures of urban authorities? What was the role of individuals, such as urban officials or humanist scholars, guild masters or clergymen in this process? Is there evidence of a circulation of knowledge between cities and towns through personal contacts, writing, copying or competition that strengthened processes of renewal? How did authorities outside the city, i.e. royal or seigniorial powers, promote or obstruct processes of renewal?
- Finally, how was the urban populace involved in processes of urban renewal? What ideas did they have about the responsibilities of the authorities in this respect? How did different groups in cities and towns pursue their often-conflicting interests with regard to economic, social and environmental renewal?

The organisers invite proposals concerning cities and towns in the period c. 1250 to c. 1750 from Western Europe, Central and Eastern Europe, as well as West Asia and North Africa, allowing for cross-cultural and diachronic comparisons.

Paper proposals can only be submitted online, via the EAUH2018 website. To submit a paper proposal, registration is required (https://eauh2018.ccmgs.it/users/). After the deadline for paper proposals submission on October 5th, 2017, session organisers will select the final list of participants based on abstract submission, and notification of acceptance of abstracts will be send by December 1st, 2017.
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Arie van Steensel

University of Groningen

a.van.steensel@rug.nl

Homepage https://eauh2018.ccmgs.it/users/index.php?pagename=cms&name=sessiontracks&trackname=multiple-authorities--citizenship-and-urban-agency-in-eurasia-in-the-premodern-eradern-era
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URL zur Zitation dieses Beitrages
<http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/termine/id=34908>
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4)
From: Benjamin Pohl <benjamin.pohl@bristol.ac.uk>
Date: 04.09.2017
Subject: CfP: Memory and the materiality of medieval texts. Leeds IMC 2018 - Bristol 7/2018
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University of Bristol, Centre for Medieval Studies (CMS), Bristol
02.07.2018-05.07.2018, University of Bristol, Centre for Medieval Studies (CMS)

It is our pleasure to announce that the Bristol Centre for Medieval Studies (CMS - http://www.bristol.ac.uk/medieval/) will be sponsoring two sessions at the Leeds International Medieval Congress 2018, 2-5 July 2018*.

If you would like to propose a 20-min paper, please make sure to submit your proposal to the session organiser, Dr Benjamin Pohl (benjamin.pohl@bristol.ac.uk), no later than Friday 15 September 2017. All proposals should consist of a paper title, short abstract (250 words max.) and CV.

Session 1 - Memory and the materiality of medieval texts I: Codices and communities

Abstract: This is the first of two related sessions sponsored by the University of Bristol’s Centre for Medieval Studies that together explore the complex and fascinating relationship between memory and the materiality of medieval texts. The session’s thematic focus will be on the various ways in which medieval manuscript codices facilitated, or even created, a sense of community and belonging amongst their users, thanks not only to their textual contents, but also, and particularly, to their material attributes. It is the crucial role of the codex as a physical object and aide-mémoire that will be at the heart of our discussion.

Possible topics might (but do not have to) include:
- The relationships between medieval books and their users
- Cultures of collective reading and memorising
- The use of manuscripts for purposes other than reading
- Manuscripts as objects of performance and veneration
- The relevance of codices as focal points of communal life and identity
- Commemoration based on material experience
- …

Session 2 - Memory and the materiality of medieval texts II: Beyond the book

Abstract: This is the second of two related sessions sponsored by the University of Bristol’s Centre for Medieval Studies that together explore the complex and fascinating relationship between memory and the materiality of medieval texts. The thematic focus of this session will be on material sources and objects other than manuscripts that played a key role in how medieval individuals and/or communities remembered, interpreted and celebrated the past. Particular attention will be paid to the narrative qualities exhibited by these objects, as well as to their potential applications within the context of medieval performative culture, commemoration, celebration and ritual.

Possible topics might (but do not have to) include:
- The interplay between medieval material, visual and textual cultures
- The rendering of texts in material form other than books
- Physical objects and storytelling
- The performative and commemorative qualities of objects
- Material sources as embodiments of the past
- The use of material objects in addition to/in lieu of books
- …
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Benjamin Pohl

University of Bristol, Department of History
13-15 Woodland Road, Bristol, BS8 1TB, UK

benjamin.pohl@bristol.ac.uk
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URL zur Zitation dieses Beitrages
<http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/termine/id=34921>
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5)
From: Sladja Blazan <S.Blazan@gmx.de>
Date: 08.09.2017
Subject: CfP: Science Fiction and Social Activism - London 9/2017
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European Association for American Studies and British Association for American Studies, London
09.09.2017-24.09.2017, European Association for American Studies and British Association for American Studies

Call for Papers:

Science Fiction and Social Activism. Panel: 32nd European Association for American Studies and 63rd British Association for American Studies Conference

What most forms of science fiction have in common is an interest in world-building as a limitless and continuously expanding narrative environment. Highly detailed and immersive narrative environments were developed as early as the late nineteenth century by authors such as H.P. Lovecraft and Edgar Rice Burroughs and have been extremely popular ever since. In a Paris Review interview, Ray Bradbury even proclaims that "Edgar Rice Burroughs never would have looked upon himself as a social mover and shaker with social obligations. But as it turns out, Burroughs is probably the most influential writer in the entire history of the world." While Burroughs influence might not be so all-encompassing, Bradbury is right when pointing out that science fiction, the genre he was writing in, is extremely useful for both, investigating habits of thought and creating them.

It is not by coincidence that Robert Heinlein’s SF classic about a human raised on Mars, Stranger in a Strange Land, boasts a title that could easily be mistaken for postcolonial literature. SF tropes of bug-eyed aliens attempting the take-over of the earth and breath-taking but completely devoid of humans worlds ready for colonization can easily be applied to (formally) existing political structures. This is one of the reasons why science fiction narratives are often used as political allegories, be it with a rather conservative or a rather liberal focus. While the use of science fiction as a forum for totalitarian phantasies has been repeatedly pointed out and analyzed, its use as a forum for social activism is only partially explored. In the meantime, a growing body of work has been and is being published which explores the connection between imagining alternative worlds and either exposing the limitations of the world we live in or proposing new social constellations. Ursula K. Le Guin, Margaret Atwood, Octavia E. Butler, Nalo Hopkins, Nnedi Okorafor, Jo Walton and Samuel R. Delany are only some of the names of the writers who come to mind in this context. Some possible topics that can be explored in relation to social activism are postcolonial science fiction, utopia, black speculative fiction, afrofuturism, afrocyberpunk, to name only a few.

I am looking for 3-4 panelists for the 32nd European Association for American Studies and 63rd British Association for American Studies Conference to take place at King’s College London, University College London and the British Library, 4-7 April 2018.

Paper proposals should be 300 words maximum, including a title.

Please submit proposals, along with a brief CV and email address, to sladja.blazan@uni-wuerzburg.de by the deadline of September 24, 2017.
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URL zur Zitation dieses Beitrages
<http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/termine/id=34969>
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Zitation
CfP: Neue Call for Panels 08.09.2017 [5], in: H-Soz-Kult, 08.09.2017, <www.hsozkult.de/text/id/texte-4263>.
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